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The second advent of Mahathir Mohamad

At age 93, he is the oldest acting head of state on the planet. He is Prime Minister of Malaysia Mahathir Mohamad, who after a 15-year hiatus returned to power in an effort to change the model of governance that he himself once created.

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New Rules for the New Global Economy

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China: gearing up for a Stride

As China steps up its international expansion to ensure stability and get ready for another breakthrough, its frightened neighbours and competitors, with the US at the forefront, are trying to respond. Beijing’s success would mean a Chinese-style reglobalisation under its leadership, suggests Aleksey Maslov in an article for the BRICS Business Magazine.

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Prevention Is the Best Migration Cure

By 2030, most of the world’s poor will live in regions suffering from some form of ‘fragility’, forcing millions to flee their homes. Donors can prepare now by allocating money to address the causes of displacement, rather than focusing disproportionately on the effects.

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Geographically Damned

As compared to Central Europe, the Balkans have always stayed underdeveloped. Why? There is a geographical hypothesis.

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A planetary mesh of perception and response

Any information, even the most random and useless, can be collected and analyzed, so the Network needs to know everything. And, most likely, to hide from the internet of things at least something in the near future will be quite difficult. As always, this state of фffairs has pros and cons. With the kind permission of the publishing house Verso BRICS Business Magazine publishes the outcome of the technological thinker Adam Greenfield’s «Radical Technology: The Design of Everyday Life».

    About BRICS Business Magazine

    BRICS Business Magazine is a bookazine —

    a book-like magazine – addressed to global investors, businessmen, politicians, and experts.


    A business and humanitarian publication on rapid-growth markets, it is issued four times a year and explains how to understand others.


    The goal of this project is to organize a direct information exchange between the BRICS countries and other emerging markets.


    We define a bookazine as a thick magazine with complex printing which is designed for slow reading and filled not in accordance with a constant set of sections, but rather in accordance with the topics chosen. Our bookazine includes (with occasional exceptions) three main kinds of data:

    • essays and columns that would fit into “Opinions” or “Recommendations” sections
    • indices, ratings, and rankings
    • business cases

    Industry and event projects as well as investment guides are featured as special add-ons.





    In Russian schools, pupils sitting at the back of the class so they can quietly chat away, far from the eyes and ears of the teacher often hear: “Hey, you there, in Kamchatka, quieter, please”. Kamchatka is incredibly far away, and it is located in a place we call the “Far East”. For many Russians this is seen as the edge of the world, and in this too common misconception lies at the roots of many problems. In fact, the Far East is our “window to the world” in the 21st century. If at the turn of the 17th and 18th centuries the “window to Europe” was St. Petersburg, which duly appeared in the Baltic Sea, today it does not seem such a crazy idea to move the capital closer to the Sea of Japan (or at least to redistribute the functions of the capital among different cities). Crossing the Pacific Ocean, we reach the most developed parts of the globe: Southeast Asia and the West Coast of the United States. For a mindset used to looking for a centre in the West, it is hard to overcome behavioural and mental stereotypes, but with every coming year, the facts will speak for themselves.
    Human, financial and commodity flows in this part of the world are such that many are already talking about the rise of a Pacific civilization that has replaced that of the Atlantic. Although the «decline» and «extinction» of Europe is a separate and very controversial issue, the concentration of intellectual and material resources in the Asia-Pacific region is such that we shouldn’t balk at comparisons with the EU. Most of the fundamental decisions in Russia, both governmental and business, are taken in Moscow, for which the Atlantic is closer and better understood, yet it is hard to dispute the fact that the largest market in the world is no longer there. The Pacific Ocean washes against not only the Asian tigers, but also the USA, Canada and Australia. In other words, the Pacific States influence, and will continue to influence, the world economy more than the Atlantic ones, which means that this clout subsequently spreads to cultural and social norms.
    This compels Russia to compare herself with ultra-technological Japan and Korea, not to mention China, which is getting richer every day. Nevertheless, of course, our task is not to catch up and overtake our neighbours, but to ensure continuous development in the region in such as way that money from the capital doesn’t erode or destroy the local institutions or the established system of local relations. The Far East is an area where the competencies, ties and mutual responsibilities «grown» here acquire special importance, where without them it is impossible to create a working programme of transformation. We should not forget that since the epoch of the Russian Empire, the Far East has been a region of perpetual development that has never been fully completed. In all likelihood, nowhere else in the world has a similar experience of «settling» such large and diverse territories; yet we can still take note of some general observations.
    The region should be an interesting and convenient place for its residents, not only for foreign investors, so that the development and support of local communities should be based in both large and small projects. The same holds with business and in general private initiative: regulation and conditions for it should stimulate and encourage growth; otherwise, the enterprising Far Easterners will continue to fulfil their potential in Shanghai, Hong Kong or Sydney. Of course, for the go-getters as well as for everyone else, there should be exciting anchor projects with the right conditions in place. You would be hard-pushed to come up with something better and more fitting than education in order to promote development, and while the Far Eastern Federal University campus inspires optimism, this is not enough for such a large region. Linking the region with the rest of the country is critically important, so that its remoteness should remain only in name. Flying to the southern outskirts of China from here is often easier than to Kazan, and this is a problem that the market has yet to address satisfactorily. Moreover, the Far East does not attract enough Russian tourists even thought there are many Koreans, Chinese and Japanese visitors. All of this seems simple and straightforward, but falls into the category of underlying problems, and if no one disputes the strategic importance of the region, it means it is time to do something about them. Then the Far East will be associated with not only the taiga or the ocean, but also with successful people doing worthwhile things.

    Authors & Experts

    Jorge Moreira da Silva
    Jorge Moreira da Silva

    Development co-operation director at the OECD, former minister of environment and energy of Portugal

    Zaki Laïdi
    Zaki Laïdi

    Professor of International Relations at Sciences Po and was an adviser to former French Prime Minister Manuel Valls. His most recent book is Le Reflux de l’Europe

    Branko Milanovic
    Branko Milanovic

    Visiting presidential professor at City University of New York Graduate Center; former lead economist in the World Bank’s research department

    Peter Singer
    Peter Singer

    professor of Bioethics at Princeton University

    Fabrice Gorlier
    Fabrice Gorlier

    CEO at JSC ISUZU RUS

    Antonio Tena-Junguito
    Antonio Tena-Junguito

    Associate professor in the Department of Social Science at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid

    Giovanni Federico
    Giovanni Federico

    Professor of Economic History at University of Pisa

    Aleksey Maslov
    Aleksey Maslov

    Professor and Head of the School of Asian Studies at the Faculty of World Economy and International Affairs, member of the Academic Council of the Higher School of Economics

    Ken Hu
    Ken Hu

    Deputy chairman and rotating CEO at Huawei Technologies

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